Thursday, 12 September 2019

ART EAST AFRICA

Lot 16 Edward Saidi Tingatinga (Tanzanian, 1932–72) Untitled (Elephant Eating from the Marula Tree), 1971, at Art Auction East Africa 2019
Edward Saidi Tingatinga, Untitled (Elephant Eating from the Marula Tree), 1971. Sold Ksh 5,635,200
7.30PM on TUESDAY 5 MARCH 2019 at The RADISSON BLU HOTEL, NAIROBI
This year, we were invited to hold the Modern and Contemporary Art Auction East Africa 2019 in the lovely ballroom at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Upper Hill, Nairobi.

With 59 Lots from seven countries, we auctioned some rare and exceptional sculptures this year; Lot 31 & 32 by the late master sculptor Samuel Wanjau; and stunning, well priced paintings dating from the 1960s to present. With an emphasis on modern and the secondary market, we were able to find some very unusual works, such as Lot 29, the Piano Player by Fabian Mpagi, and Lot 25 by the late Robin Anderson.

We welcomed KCB, Kenya’s largest bank, as our new partner, and new drinks sponsors, Glenfiddich whisky and Hendricks gin.
Auctioneer, Chilson Wamoja, who has assisted us at all our auctions took the sale this year.
Record sales of USD 300,000 for 2019
The Sixth Art Auction East Africa 2019 was the record auction sale since the auction began in 2013.  Total sales exceeded KSH 30 million (USD 300,000).  90% of the 59 Lots sold on the night, another auction record.
Enquiries
Danda Jaroljmek +254 722 672938 info@artauctioneastafrica.com
Auction Catalogue
Art Auction East Africa 2019 Catalogue Cover
 
 
Source: ART AUCTION EAST AFRICA | https://artauctioneastafrica.com

Wednesday, 11 September 2019

Jean Pigozzi on Africa


I really like this interview with Jean Pigozzi. His Collection is really authentic and his earlier works pre-Internet are fantastic, it so rare to find African homegrown Art today. The support really goes to those trained in the West so this is so refreshing..


Take a look at the Jean Pigozzi Collection | http://www.caacart.com/

Thursday, 15 August 2019

Kuba Dance Skirts | Democratic Republic of Congo


African Kuba Raffia & Cowrie Shell Dance Skirt - 1950s

 

Estimate | $4,000 - $5,000


Central Africa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kuba, ca. mid 20th century CE. Framed Kuba cloth comprised of three panels sewn together - each one presenting bold geometric patterns - a plethora of diamond and chevron motifs - in warm earth tones: chocolate brown, tawny red, and warm tan on a creamy beige ground. Traditionally, kuba cloth is woven from raffia-tree leaves; this example is comprised of naturally colored fabric created via a laborious process of hand-dyeing using mud, indigo, or the powdered bark of the camwood tree. Such cloths are usually created by Kuba men on a single heddle loom. Next they are embroidered by women and children to create an uncut or cut-pile appearance (the latter resembling a velvet or velour texture). Kuba cloths are worn during ceremonial events, especially funerals; however, they are also found in tapestries and home furnishings. The abstract geometric patterns are symbolic of an individual's social and marital status, age, and/or personal attributes or character. Size: 20" W x 19.75" H (50.8 cm x 50.2 cm); 25.25" W x 25.875" H (64.1 cm x 65.7 cm) framed

and here is another:

African Kuba Raffia & Cowrie Shell Dance Skirt - 1950s

 

Estimate | $4,000 - $5,000
 
 
 
 
 

Artemis Gallery

686 S Taylor Ave, Ste 106
Louisville, CO 80027
United States
 

Kube Dance Skirt | Democratic Republic of Congo


African Kuba Raffia & Cowrie Shell Dance Skirt - 1950s

 

Estimate | $4,000 - $5,000



 
Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, ca. 1950. A traditional Kuba dance skirt (Tcaka) - handmade from raffia and hand-stitched with immense artistry, presenting bold geometric patterns in warm earth tones - rich browns and toasty almond beiges - as well as pops of more vibrant color - magenta, blue, green, and pink. Such cloths are usually created by Kuba men on a single heddle loom. Next they are embroidered by women and children to create an uncut or cut-pile appearance. Highly decorative and created with painstaking technique, this skirt presents panels of checkerboard patterns and an applied overlapping zigzag/diamond motif comprised of pink, black, and houndstooth fabrics. The trim is made of alternating passages of cut raffia pom poms and cowrie shells. A particularly exceptional example given that it is made of raffia, demonstrates immense artistry with intricate patterns, skillfully executed weaving, beautiful hues, and also boasts a generous size and excellent condition. Size: 260" L x 33" H (660.4 cm x 83.8 cm)

Kuba cloths are worn during ceremonial events, especially funerals; however, they are also found in tapestries and home furnishings. The abstract geometric patterns are symbolic of an individual's social and marital status, age, and/or personal attributes or character.

There are several theories concerning the inspiration for Kuba style. One theory suggests that the designs in Kuba textiles are rooted in tribal scarification patterns. Another suggests that the motifs of Kuba textiles were modeled upon those found in crop patterns. Still another suggests that the source for their visual patterns was divine intervention. The creation of these ceremonial wraps is a collaborative effort. Men are involved in all stages of preparing the fiber and executing the weaving, whereas women soften the textiles and apply the decoration. These coveted ceremonial textiles are worn during ritual dances and special occasions such as festivals, weddings, funerals, and initiation rites.


Artemis Gallery

686 S Taylor Ave, Ste 106
Louisville, CO 80027
United States
 



Monday, 15 July 2019

AB (Albino Bird) by Frank Bowling

Artist: Frank Bowling RA, OBE
Nationality: English
DOD: 26th February 1934
Title: AB (Albino bird)
Medium: Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
Size: 44 x 43.2 cm. (17.3 x 17 in.)
Date:  2008
Location: Royal Academy Summer Exhibition































What Does A Million Pound Painting Look Like?

Frank Bowling AB (Albino Bird) 
Author Keilah Wells Keilah Wells
Date: 21/06/2019

Born in Guyana (then British Guiana) Bowling moved to London in 1953, and while serving in the RAF met Keith Critchlow who introduced him to the London art scene. He went on to study at the Royal College of Art alongside David Hockney and R.B Kitaj and became the first Black artist nominated as a Royal Academician. Having graduated with the Silver Award from the Royal College in 1962, Frank Bowling’s artistic career looked promising. In 1964, he had some success with his paintings of “Beggars” from his homeland of Guyana. It became abundantly clear that the Art Community in London were delighted with works that encouraged and reinforced negativity from a black artist. There was an appetite for figurative works that depicted the poverty and hardship when displaying images of black people and this left a bitter taste in the artist’s mouth. Bowling had found his first trap and was exposed to the subtle racism in artistic circles, that ugly hang-over from days of Empire that still remained up until the latter part of the 20th Century.

Over the next two years that hopeful promise soon came to an end. Bowling notes that galleries and museums were ‘blocking’ him with the excuse of not wanting such an “unusual artist” as himself.  There were few black artists in London at the time, so his only option was to travel to the States, where the art scene was more upbeat, inclusive and one of the most creative times in New York’s history. The movement at the time was, The New York School which, was an informal group of American poets, painters, dancers, and musicians active in the 1950s and 1960s in New York City. The artists included Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to mention a few.

With gritty determination Bowling flew to NYC in 1966 and by 1967 he had gathered together a number of talented artists that shared his world view and established a group known as “5-Plus-1”, made up of abstract artists of African descent such as Sam Gilliam, Jack Whitten, Mel Edwards and Alma Thomas, among others. The common denominator that ran throughout the group, were the themes of displacement, identity and a sense of belonging. So began the artist’s personal exorcisms in the form of mapping ~ maps of South America and British Guyana. Places in the world that are often overlooked yet governed and controlled by Britain and America. The works were quickly accepted but it became clear to Bowling that this notion of “otherness” was an intellectual ambush, a snare that lead, the artist and his works to be pigeon-holed and categorized as “Black Art”. Determined not to be marginalized, it was in the seventies that Bowling really emerged as an International Artist, creating his own abstract style that he calls, “the Pours”, which involves pouring, dripping and even flicking liquids onto canvases, allowing the works to cook, blend together and eventually dry. These bold works sat elegantly in the chic world of American Abstraction.

*Check out: Frank Bowling Video

The years that followed were filled with setbacks and disappointments, the beautiful struggle. In an article written by Tate Curator Elena Crippa , she states, "The return to London also marked a period of making but not showing for Bowling. He was, quite simply, ignored by the British establishment. The next 40 years were spent criss-crossing the Atlantic to New York where he was better represented. Like all abstract artists, Bowling was interested in technique and materiality, not identity, yet it seemed the UK was unable to accept Bowling as that."

Bowling, undeterred set about to ensure that the galleries and the international curators took his works seriously. Fortunately for Bowling, he had his feet in two camps, one in London and one in NYC and his strong friendship with Joe Overstreet enabled him to stay positive and focused. Together they put on some of the most dynamic and exciting shows, expertly produced by the talented curator, Carl E. Hazlewood. Although a part-time New Yorker, Bowling managed to built up an extraordinary group of artists, whilst working out of his studio in Brooklyn.

By 2008, with relative success in the States under his belt, a now mature and confident Bowling, turned his attention to London and decided to create a piece for the Royal Academy of Art, in Piccadilly. The RA Summer Exhibition an annual event, that briefly houses over 1,470 works of art. The competition is fierce and the very idea of occupying space at this show is regarded as vulgar and against wall yardage etiquette. In many respects the Exhibition requires a certain kind of discipline. The planning must be concise and understated. Artworks are hung among the many and surrounded by the noise of busy paintings that stretch from floor to ceiling. It is therefore imperative that the message ‘packs a punch’. By limiting the size of the works encourages a sense of intimacy, a personal connection with the artist. The make-up of this prestigious event in central London is a mix of subtly, technical know-how, coupled with a captivating subject matter, these factors and more need to be taken into consideration when composing a work for the Academy.

The work that Bowling produced for the Exhibition should certainly be regarded as one of his finest. To refer to it as his “Masterpiece” is a little early but regardless, it shows an artist at the height of his powers. The work combines many aspects of Bowling career, figurative, symbolic abstraction under the provocative and powerful title, AB (Albino Bird), 2008. The majority attending the Exhibition are the ladies that like to lunch, the silver surfers, the well-informed golden oldies, travelling in from the home-counties. The big day out, marching through the corridors of the Academy, the Art appreciation society, excitingly talking and walking whilst admiring the works. In marketing terms, this target audience falls into the socio-economic demographics of the AB’s of the country, Albino Birds indeed.

Photo by Sue Moore (B&B reader)
Not every white bird is albino.
It's more common for birds to have partial albinism,
like this robin does.


Let us focus on the work. What is evident here, is Bowling’s skillful aptitude to talk to a British audience. His canny ability to switch the narrative, from figurative to abstraction and symbolic story-telling. Diving into the work, what is initially strikingly is the work’s simplicity, primitive even. On closer inspection the story slowly unravels. In the centre there sits a robin…A robin red-breast, depicting the arrogance of Empire, the red coats of Colonialism. As we look into the work we begin to hear that familiar nursery rhyme in our heads, “Who killed cock robin? I, said the sparrow, with my bow and arrow..” So we see the robin as a figure of our brutal past, the Troops of red coats, trampling onto foreign soils. Bravely occupying the uncivilized natives with their muskets and rifles.  But it is the sparrow, the bird that migrates to Africa in the winter and returns again to welcome in the summer ~ it is the courageous sparrow with his bow and arrow…that finally, wipes out the notion of Colonialism, of natural section and white supremacy. 

The blue circle around the robin reminds us of a round robin tournament, an all-play-all game until the victor emerges triumphant. Having experienced so many obstacles and barriers to break down, Bowling is prepared for any surprise attack. The artist’s wounds over the years have only made him stronger. Today, he is fully aware of the sleepy lions, hidden in the long grasses, ready to pounce. He is able to speak out with such conviction and confidence, de-fanging the viperous tongue-lashings from the critics. This work speaks of Victory, as all the bases have been covered.

Tate Curator, Elena Crippa writes: "That Bowling’s work is finally getting the recognition it deserves is gratifying, yet reveals inconvenient truths about how the British art establishment has treated artists from minority backgrounds throughout the history of 20th-century art."

This unpretentious painting is one of the greatest works of Art in the 21st Century. Clearly, the artist’s time spent in New York has been revealing and the evidence is dewily noted. Bowling has grown into a tour de force, confidently satisfying both an American and a British audience with ease and as he says himself, “the time spent in America has enabled me to grow a backbone.”


Artist: Frank Bowling RA, OBE
Nationality: English
DOD: 26th February 1934
Title: AB (Albino bird)
Medium: Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
Size: 44 x 43.2 cm. (17.3 x 17 in.)
Date:  2008
Location: Royal Academy Summer Exhibition


If interested in this work contact: CHRISTIE'S | LONDON
 

Modern British & Irish Art


Alice Murray

Associate Director
 
Alice joined Christie's in 2011 and started her career in the Victorian Pictures, and British Drawings and Watercolours departments. Following her love for Modern art, she joined the Modern British and Irish Art department in 2012 where she was involved with the Noël Coward sale (2015), the Brian Sewell collection (2016) and the record-breaking Defining British Art sale (2016).

In 2016, as Head of Sale for the department’s South Kensington auctions, she ran the inaugural online sale for Modern British and Irish Art. Following its success, Alice was appointed Head of Online and Mid-Season sales for both the Modern British and Impressionist and Modern Art departments in 2017, where she sources business and undertakes valuations of works of art across both categories, with a particular interest in European and British Modernism and the work of Stanley Spencer.

Alice holds a First Class Honours degree with Distinction in spoken Spanish from Edinburgh University, where her dissertation in French focused on the interplay of word and image in the cubist movement at the start of the 20th century. Having studied at the University of Salamanca, and at Stendhal University in Grenoble, Alice speaks French, Spanish and English.

Saturday, 22 June 2019

Frank Bowling | Tiger Falls, 1980

Frank Bowling RA, OBE
Tiger Falls
signed, titled and dated '“TIGER FALLS” Frank Bowling 1980' on the reverse
acrylic on canvas
117.5 x 64.5 cm (46 1/4 x 25 3/8 in.)
Painted in 1980.
20th Century Work of Art
 
Estimate
£40,000 - 60,000

Phillips Sale on 28th June 2019



“TIGER FALLS” Frank Bowling 1980
“TIGER FALLS” Frank Bowling 1980


“TIGER FALLS” Frank Bowling 1980
“TIGER FALLS” Frank Bowling 1980'








































Provenance

Spanierman Modern Gallery, New York
Private Collection, California

Catalogue Essay

‘In my youth I tended to look at the tragic side of human behaviour and try and reflect that in my work, but gradually as I became more involved in the making of paintings, I realised that one of the main ingredients in making paintings was colour and geometry.’ - Frank Bowling

Undoubtedly one of Britain’s finest formalist painters, Frank Bowling’s painterly practice is currently being celebrated at the artist’s retrospective at the Tate Britain this summer. Since the 1960s, Bowling has been testing and stretching the possibilities of painting, continuing to experiment with form and materials. Born in Guyana, Bowling moved to Britain as a teenager and studied at the Royal College of Art in the early 1960s alongside David Hockney and R.B. Kitaj. Although Bowling achieved early recognition in London, he decided to move to New York in 1966 where his paintings became less constrained by the representational. Pursuing formalism on his own terms, Bowling built a tilting platform in his New York and London studios that enabled him to pour paint from heights of up to two metres, creating daring work that was the product of controlled accidents.

The present work, Tiger Falls, was executed in 1980, by which time Bowling had been refining his abstract painting for a decade. Bowling’s deep understanding of the motion and colour of paint is evident in this dynamic composition of violet and ochre. Warm and cool hues are blended together, calmly spilling from the top-left corner over the finely-dappled layers underneath. Unlike the hard and rigid lines of American abstraction, visible in the work of Morris Louis or Kenneth Noland, Tiger Falls is an exploration into both the formal materiality as well as atmospheric suggestiveness of paint. In unison with the title, Bowling’s application of the medium is an organic mixture of impasto and thinner painterly washes, both invoking the natural world. Retaining a captivating ambiguity, Tiger Falls transports us into the depths of nature, inviting the viewer’s eye to follow the cascades of paint in motion.



Contact Specialist

Phillips
Tamila Kerimova
Specialist, Head of Day Sale
+ 44 20 7318 4065
tkerimova@phillips.com

Thursday, 20 June 2019

Frank Bowling AB (Albino Bird) by Keilah Wells

 
Artist: Frank Bowling RA, OBE
Nationality: English
DOD: 26th February 1934
Title: AB (Albino bird)
Medium: Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
Size: 44 x 43.2 cm. (17.3 x 17 in.)
Date:  2008
Location: Royal Academy Summer Exhibition































What Does A Million Pound Painting Look Like?

Frank Bowling AB (Albino Bird) 
Author Keilah Wells Keilah Wells
Date: 21/06/2019

Born in Guyana (then British Guiana) Bowling moved to London in 1953, and while serving in the RAF met Keith Critchlow who introduced him to the London art scene. He went on to study at the Royal College of Art alongside David Hockney and R.B Kitaj and became the first Black artist nominated as a Royal Academician. Having graduated with the Silver Award from the Royal College in 1962, Frank Bowling’s artistic career looked promising. In 1964, he had some success with his paintings of “Beggars” from his homeland of Guyana. It became abundantly clear that the Art Community in London were delighted with works that encouraged and reinforced negativity from a black artist. There was an appetite for figurative works that depicted the poverty and hardship when displaying images of black people and this left a bitter taste in the artist’s mouth. Bowling had found his first trap and was exposed to the subtle racism in artistic circles, that ugly hang-over from days of Empire that still remained up until the latter part of the 20th Century.

Over the next two years that hopeful promise soon came to an end. Bowling notes that galleries and museums were ‘blocking’ him with the excuse of not wanting such an “unusual artist” as himself.  There were few black artists in London at the time, so his only option was to travel to the States, where the art scene was more upbeat, inclusive and one of the most creative times in New York’s history. The movement at the time was, The New York School which, was an informal group of American poets, painters, dancers, and musicians active in the 1950s and 1960s in New York City. The artists included Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to mention a few.

With gritty determination Bowling flew to NYC in 1966 and by 1967 he had gathered together a number of talented artists that shared his world view and established a group known as “5-Plus-1”, made up of abstract artists of African descent such as Sam Gilliam, Jack Whitten, Mel Edwards and Alma Thomas, among others. The common denominator that ran throughout the group, were the themes of displacement, identity and a sense of belonging. So began the artist’s personal exorcisms in the form of mapping ~ maps of South America and British Guyana. Places in the world that are often overlooked yet governed and controlled by Britain and America. The works were quickly accepted but it became clear to Bowling that this notion of “otherness” was an intellectual ambush, a snare that lead, the artist and his works to be pigeon-holed and categorized as “Black Art”. Determined not to be marginalized, it was in the seventies that Bowling really emerged as an International Artist, creating his own abstract style that he calls, “the Pours”, which involves pouring, dripping and even flicking liquids onto canvases, allowing the works to cook, blend together and eventually dry. These bold works sat elegantly in the chic world of American Abstraction.

*Check out: Frank Bowling Video

The years that followed were filled with setbacks and disappointments, the beautiful struggle. In an article written by Tate Curator Elena Crippa , she states, "The return to London also marked a period of making but not showing for Bowling. He was, quite simply, ignored by the British establishment. The next 40 years were spent criss-crossing the Atlantic to New York where he was better represented. Like all abstract artists, Bowling was interested in technique and materiality, not identity, yet it seemed the UK was unable to accept Bowling as that."

Bowling, undeterred set about to ensure that the galleries and the international curators took his works seriously. Fortunately for Bowling, he had his feet in two camps, one in London and one in NYC and his strong friendship with Joe Overstreet enabled him to stay positive and focused. Together they put on some of the most dynamic and exciting shows, expertly produced by the talented curator, Carl E. Hazlewood. Although a part-time New Yorker, Bowling managed to built up an extraordinary group of artists, whilst working out of his studio in Brooklyn.

By 2008, with relative success in the States under his belt, a now mature and confident Bowling, turned his attention to London and decided to create a piece for the Royal Academy of Art, in Piccadilly. The RA Summer Exhibition an annual event, that briefly houses over 1,470 works of art. The competition is fierce and the very idea of occupying space at this show is regarded as vulgar and against wall yardage etiquette. In many respects the Exhibition requires a certain kind of discipline. The planning must be concise and understated. Artworks are hung among the many and surrounded by the noise of busy paintings that stretch from floor to ceiling. It is therefore imperative that the message ‘packs a punch’. By limiting the size of the works encourages a sense of intimacy, a personal connection with the artist. The make-up of this prestigious event in central London is a mix of subtly, technical know-how, coupled with a captivating subject matter, these factors and more need to be taken into consideration when composing a work for the Academy.

The work that Bowling produced for the Exhibition should certainly be regarded as one of his finest. To refer to it as his “Masterpiece” is a little early but regardless, it shows an artist at the height of his powers. The work combines many aspects of Bowling career, figurative, symbolic abstraction under the provocative and powerful title, AB (Albino Bird), 2008. The majority attending the Exhibition are the ladies that like to lunch, the silver surfers, the well-informed golden oldies, travelling in from the home-counties. The big day out, marching through the corridors of the Academy, the Art appreciation society, excitingly talking and walking whilst admiring the works. In marketing terms, this target audience falls into the socio-economic demographics of the AB’s of the country, Albino Birds indeed.

Photo by Sue Moore (B&B reader)
Not every white bird is albino.
It's more common for birds to have partial albinism,
like this robin does.


Let us focus on the work. What is evident here, is Bowling’s skillful aptitude to talk to a British audience. His canny ability to switch the narrative, from figurative to abstraction and symbolic story-telling. Diving into the work, what is initially strikingly is the work’s simplicity, primitive even. On closer inspection the story slowly unravels. In the centre there sits a robin…A robin red-breast, depicting the arrogance of Empire, the red coats of Colonialism. As we look into the work we begin to hear that familiar nursery rhyme in our heads, “Who killed cock robin? I, said the sparrow, with my bow and arrow..” So we see the robin as a figure of our brutal past, the Troops of red coats, trampling onto foreign soils. Bravely occupying the uncivilized natives with their muskets and rifles.  But it is the sparrow, the bird that migrates to Africa in the winter and returns again to welcome in the summer ~ it is the courageous sparrow with his bow and arrow…that finally, wipes out the notion of Colonialism, of natural section and white supremacy. 

The blue circle around the robin reminds us of a round robin tournament, an all-play-all game until the victor emerges triumphant. Having experienced so many obstacles and barriers to break down, Bowling is prepared for any surprise attack. The artist’s wounds over the years have only made him stronger. Today, he is fully aware of the sleepy lions, hidden in the long grasses, ready to pounce. He is able to speak out with such conviction and confidence, de-fanging the viperous tongue-lashings from the critics. This work speaks of Victory, as all the bases have been covered.

Tate Curator, Elena Crippa writes: "That Bowling’s work is finally getting the recognition it deserves is gratifying, yet reveals inconvenient truths about how the British art establishment has treated artists from minority backgrounds throughout the history of 20th-century art."

This unpretentious painting is one of the greatest works of Art in the 21st Century. Clearly, the artist’s time spent in New York has been revealing and the evidence is dewily noted. Bowling has grown into a tour de force, confidently satisfying both an American and a British audience with ease and as he says himself, “the time spent in America has enabled me to grow a backbone.”


Artist: Frank Bowling RA, OBE
Nationality: English
DOD: 26th February 1934
Title: AB (Albino bird)
Medium: Acrylic and mixed media on canvas
Size: 44 x 43.2 cm. (17.3 x 17 in.)
Date:  2008
Location: Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 

If interested in this work contact: CHRISTIE'S | LONDON

Modern British & Irish Art


Alice Murray

Associate Director
 
Alice joined Christie's in 2011 and started her career in the Victorian Pictures, and British Drawings and Watercolours departments. Following her love for Modern art, she joined the Modern British and Irish Art department in 2012 where she was involved with the Noël Coward sale (2015), the Brian Sewell collection (2016) and the record-breaking Defining British Art sale (2016).

In 2016, as Head of Sale for the department’s South Kensington auctions, she ran the inaugural online sale for Modern British and Irish Art. Following its success, Alice was appointed Head of Online and Mid-Season sales for both the Modern British and Impressionist and Modern Art departments in 2017, where she sources business and undertakes valuations of works of art across both categories, with a particular interest in European and British Modernism and the work of Stanley Spencer.

Alice holds a First Class Honours degree with Distinction in spoken Spanish from Edinburgh University, where her dissertation in French focused on the interplay of word and image in the cubist movement at the start of the 20th century. Having studied at the University of Salamanca, and at Stendhal University in Grenoble, Alice speaks French, Spanish and English.